Diagnosing Headache in Primary Care: Red Flags

clinical topics neurology urgent care Jun 07, 2022
An image of two women in a light background with a text Diagnosing Headache in Primary Care (Red Flags)

⭐️ CME Opportunity for this video below ⭐️

Patients who come into primary care for a headache are often worried that it’s something very serious – and it’s your job to know whether it is or not. Many headaches are nothing overly serious, but as a new grad, it can be hard to know just how concerned to be and what to do with your concern.

Diagnosing Headache Red Flags in Primary Care

Let’s build your confidence and demystify some of the grey areas of headaches. In this video, we’ll cover:

✅ A simple tool that you can use to guide your visit, assessment, and plan

✅ Specific headache red flags, and what to do if you encounter them

✅ When to worry and what to worry about

✅ When to refer patients out

Headaches in a primary care setting can be confusing when you are getting started, but the more you see and the more you manage, the more clarity that you will gain. Use these tips to prepare for your next headache patient and be confident in your assessment, treatment, and referral. 

SNOOP10 acronym:

  • Systemic symptoms including fever
  • Neoplasm history
  • Neurologic deficit (including decreased consciousness)
  • Onset is sudden or abrupt
  • Older age (onset after age 50 years)
  • Pattern change or recent onset of new headache
  • Positional headache
  • Precipitated by sneezing, coughing, or exercise
  • Papilledema
  • Progressive headache and atypical presentations
  • Pregnancy or puerperium
  • Painful eye with autonomic features
  • Post-traumatic onset of headache
  • Pathology of the immune system such as HIV
  • Painkiller (analgesic) overuse (eg, medication overuse headache) or new drug at onset of headache

Link to headache diary: https://headaches.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/HEADACHE-DIARY.pdf+

(FYI: to slow down the audio speed, hit the gear symbol in the bottom right corner and change it to .75x or .5x. Closed captions are also located at the bottom R  corner of the video.)

🎉 CME opportunity available for this video!

Here's how it works:

1. Click on this CME link: https://earnc.me/C3L0B2 Sign up for $10 for this video episode.

2. Answer 2 reflective “nudges” AKA questions about what you learned and how it applies to your practice

3. Earn 1 hour of AMA PRA Category 1 CME credit! You can download your credits when you’re ready to use them (applicable for AANP, ANCC, and NCCPA certifications!) 

This is a 3-month pilot program to see if this is something that would serve our nurse practitioners and physician associates going forward! To learn more about how you can access these CME opportunities, go to: https://info.cmefy.com 

The CME experience for The Real World NP Podcast, Youtube Channel, and Blog posts is powered by CMEfy - a seamless way for busy clinician learners to discover Internet Point-of-Care Learning opportunities that reward AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).™ Learn more at http://about.cmefy.com/cme-info

Accessibility Matters: Read The Transcript Here

SUPPORT & EDUCATION, WITHOUT THE FLUFF

Get these weekly video & podcast episodes delivered to your inbox.

Becoming a skillful NP is a marathon, not a sprint. The Real World NP team is here to help guide you and support you along the way, with relevant, concise weekly bite-sized clinical pearls & practice tips.

We hate SPAM. We will never sell your information, for any reason.

Most Recent

NP Board Prep For Family Nurse Practitioner Students

Nov 17, 2022

Treating Anticoagulated Patients

Nov 15, 2022

Determining The Cause Of Microscopic Hematuria

Nov 08, 2022

SUPPORT & EDUCATION, WITHOUT THE FLUFF

Get weekly podcast & video episodes delivered to your inbox.

Becoming a skillful NP is a marathon, not a sprint. The Real World NP team is here to help guide you and support you along the way, with relevant, concise weekly bite-sized clinical pearls & practice tips.

We never spam you or sell your contact info. Unsub anytime.